Photographers try to challenge assumptions about Haiti.

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Photographers try to challenge assumptions about Haiti.

When President trump’s comments on immigration made people around the world nervous earlier this month, Dorchester’s Anthony adamnick was not surprised.

The comments are said to include trump asking why “all these people from all over the world” want to come to the United States to discuss African countries and Haitian immigrants with lawmakers.

Photographer Adamick, 34, took photos of Haiti and its people nine months ago and began issuing them two weeks before his provocative comments.

He funded his projects, including his trip to Haiti, and Shared his photos on his website and on social media. He also exhibited his works at galleries in the Boston area, such as the piano art gallery on Tremont street.

We asked Adamick about the current political climate and his mission.

Q: what did you think when you first heard about trump’s comments?

A: I’m not surprised, but I’m angry. While I was editing the photos, I was reliving the time there, and his comments hurt me. I continued to post my work online and wrote a review of my latest picture of trump’s comments from the Haiti series.

By Sophie cannon earth correspondent jan 26, 2018.

When President trump’s comments on immigration made people around the world nervous earlier this month, Dorchester’s Anthony adamnick was not surprised.

The comments are said to include trump asking why “all these people from all over the world” want to come to the United States to discuss African countries and Haitian immigrants with lawmakers.

Adamick’s response? Challenge trump and other assumptions that defy immigration and capture the reality of Haiti and the Haitian people.

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Photographer Adamick, 34, took photos of Haiti and its people nine months ago and began issuing them two weeks before his provocative comments.

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He funded his projects, including his trip to Haiti, and Shared his photos on his website and on social media. He also exhibited his works at galleries in the Boston area, such as the piano art gallery on Tremont street.

We asked Adamick about the current political climate and his mission.

Q: what did you think when you first heard about trump’s comments?

A: I’m not surprised, but I’m angry. While I was editing the photos, I was reliving the time there, and his comments hurt me. I continued to post my work online and wrote a review of my latest picture of trump’s comments from the Haiti series.

Q: if you could show the President your job, what would you expect from him?

A: I hope he has an understanding that you can’t judge things on the surface. When I went to Haiti, some things were not very good, but meeting these people, knowing their identity and their community, I wanted him to see that this was not just a national shame. Talk to people, learn from people, and then you will have some ideas.

Q: why does Haiti resonate with you?

A: there are a lot of Haitian people moving to Dorchester and Mattapan in the early to mid 90s, and I remember being with them in high school. People at school talk about Haitian immigrants, saying they don’t wear deodorant, or they do witchcraft, or they have AIDS. Boston’s school system was a tough one for the Haitian immigrants. Growing up in Dorchester, when haitians entered the community, there was a derogatory notion that I went to Haiti to change these ideas. I’m not a Haitian but as an artist, I feel I have a responsibility to show the truth.

Q: what was your response to your work in the Boston area?

A: once I showed the Haitian people a man who had never been to Haiti. My work was wonderful. They don’t know how beautiful their country is. It was a great moment, and I realized that my job was actually doing something.

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